International day of the Girl Child and why gender equality is key to ending poverty.


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Emma Watson has been widely praised for her recent speech on gender equality as a UN Goodwill Ambassador. And rightly so. Emma is promoting a new initiative called HeForShe which is a call for men to join in and feel included in the conversation about gender equality. Or as she put it, “extend a formal invitation” to join the cause.

In recent years, there have been many campaigns focusing on equal rights and education for girls and women and many studies showing the positive effects equal opportunities for the sexes can have in the fight against poverty.October 11th has been declared the “ International day of the Girl Child” as part of a worldwide initiative by the charity Plan International. I used to fundraise for Plan when I lived in Australia and have been a supporter of their ” Because I Am A Girl” campaign for about five years now.

While extreme poverty is a global issue which affects many demographics, women and girls are still disproportionately affected by poverty and suffer many more injustices, like child marriage, FGM (female genital mutilation), honour killings, rape and domestic abuse and death from complications during pregnancy or childbirth. In many countries across the developing world, women are denied the education and opportunities afforded to their male counterparts.

In the developing world 3 million girls in Africa are at risk of FGM this year.

1 in 3 girls will be married before they turn 18 and 1 in 9 before they reach 15.

Victims of early and forced marriage typically have children very young.

Approximately 70,000 girls die in labour every year because their bodies aren’t ready for childbirth.

Globally, 65 MILLION girls are not in school.

In Africa, 101 million girls aged 10 and over have been subjected to FGM.

Women are in general 14 times more likely to die in a disaster than men

These numbers are absolutely shocking.

From my own experiences volunteering in Asia, it is strikingly obvious that it is a massive disadvantage to be a woman in the developing world. In Vietnam, I volunteered at The Little Rose Warm Shelter, a home for girls who had been or were at risk of being, sexually abused or trafficked. In Cambodia, where I volunteered on two occasions, you didn’t need to look far to see the huge prostitution problem, with girls as young as 11 and 12 walking the streets.

Educating women and empowering them to has proven to be hugely successful where implemented. Educated women marry later in life, have smaller families and they are much more likely to put their own children in school. Their increased literacy and numeracy skills give them better careers and awareness of health issues.

Just one extra year in high school can increase a woman’s salary by between 15 and 25%, and as a knock-on effect, the income of her entire family.

a woman with a better education is more likely to survive childbirth, and her children are more likely to survive early childhood.

girls with a high school education are 6 times LESS likely to be married as children

Volunteering with Women’s Charities

If you are planning to volunteer or donate and want to get involved with charities especially focused on women and girls here are some fantastic organisations to consider;

The Little Rose Warm Shelter, Vietnam

Plan International

HeForShe

Additionally, if you have volunteered somewhere with a woman’s charity and would like to share your experiences or some advice, please e-mail me on volunteerasia@hotmail.com so I can add your organisation to this post.

 

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2 thoughts on “International day of the Girl Child and why gender equality is key to ending poverty.

  1. Hi Leanne,

    I hope this email finds you well and I hope you don’t mind the contact.

    I’ve been researching on volunteering opportunities in Vietnam and came across your recommendation for the charities: The Shelter Collection, The Little Rose Warm Shelter and the Vietnam Volunteer Network (primarily through this post http://www.reachtoteachrecruiting.com/blog/a-how-to-guide-to-volunteering-in-vietnam/). Volunteering has always been something that I’ve wanted to do but I don’t want to go into it being ignorant and end up creating more harm than good despite personal good intentions (e.g. indirect proliferation of orphanage child trafficking through the voluntourism industry)

    As a result, I’m trying to find local organisations within Ho Chi Minh city that are reputable, has a proven track record of creating impactful change and are in need of support and assistance. The three charities that you recommended were of interest to me and I intend to reach out to them individually as well. However, I was hoping to learn more about how you came across these organisations and what your opinions are of each one? Have you worked with any of them before or have heard about others’ reviews on their charity program and impact?

    Thanks to the power of Google, I also came across your blog which has been a great read for a volunteering starter like myself. Any advice you can spare in relation to the charities above would be much appreciated. Many thanks Leanne and I look forward to hearing from you.

    Kind Regards,
    Linh

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